Licensed Court Interpreters

Frequently Asked Questions 

Basic and Master Court Interpreter designations (HB 4445)

  1. Master – Permits the interpreter to interpret court proceedings in all courts in this state, including justice courts and municipal courts.

    Basic – Permits the interpreter to interpret court proceedings in justice courts and municipal courts that are not municipal courts of record, other than a proceeding before the court in which the judge is acting as a magistrate.

  2. You must score 70% or higher on each part of the oral examination to obtain a Master Designation.

  3. You must score 60-69% on each part of the oral examination to obtain a Basic Designation.

General

  1. Under Section 57.002 of the Texas Government Code, a licensed court interpreter must be appointed when a court proceeding is in a county whose population is 50,000 or more and when at least one of the following occurs:

    1. Upon the motion of a party;
    2. Upon the motion of the court; or
    3. Upon request of a witness.
  2. Court proceedings in Section 57.002 include civil and criminal trials, depositions, mediations, court-ordered arbitrations, and arraignments.

  3. Section 57.002 does not apply to federal courts.

  4. According to the April 2010 census, the following 54 counties have populations exceeding 50,000: Anderson, Angelina, Bastrop, Bell, Bexar, Bowie, Brazoria, Brazos, Cameron, Cherokee, Collin, Comal, Coryell, Dallas, Denton, Ector, El Paso, Ellis, Fort Bend, Galveston, Grayson, Gregg, Guadalupe, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Hays, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hood, Hunt, Jefferson, Johnson, Kaufman, Liberty, Lubbock, Maverick, McLennan, Midland, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Nueces, Orange, Parker, Potter, Randall, ROckwall, Rusk, San Patricio, Smith, Starr, Tarrant, Taylor, Tom Green, Travis, Van Zandt, Victoria, Walker, Webb, Wichita, Williamson, and Wise.

  5. Texas law does not require appointment of a licensed court interpreter in those counties. The law, however, specifies that the appointed interpreter must be qualified as an expert under the Texas Rules of Evidence, must be at least 18 years of age, and must not be a party to the proceeding. Since the JBCC's role is that of a licensing agency, the JBCC has no authority in those situations.

  6. The Commission has no role in the setting of compensation or the hiring of interpreters.

  7. The scope of Chapter 57 includes civil and criminal proceedings, and the Texas Attorney General held in Opinion No. JC-0579 that grand jury proceedings are considered to be criminal proceedings that may require the appointment of a licensed court interpreter.

  8. According to Texas Attorney General Opinion NO. JC-0584, a court has the authority to determine whether a party or witness is able to communicate in English and requires an interpreter.

  9. Yes. Assuming that the parent cannot communicate in English and requires an interpreter, Opinion JC-0584 holds that because a court may impose conditions or sanctions against the parent, the parent should be treated as a party and may be entitled to a licensed court interpreter.

  10. In a county with a population of 50,000 or more, if a court determines that a licensed court interpreter is needed to interpret in Spanish, and one exists but resides in a distant location, the court is required to appoint that person. However, if the interpreter is for a language other than Spanish and the court finds there is no licensed court interpreter for that language within 75 miles, the court may appoint an interpreter who is not licensed. The unlicensed interpreter must be at least 18 and must not be a party. Also, the court must qualify the unlicensed interpreter as an expert under the Texas Rules of Evidence.

  11. If there are no licensed interpreters to interpret in a particular language, then a court may appoint an interpreter who is not licensed.

  12. As long as you are not advertising, representing yourself to be, or acting as a licensed court interpreter, there is no violation of Section 157.106.

Licensing

  1. Section 57.002 of the Texas Government Code requires the appointment of a licensed court interpreter by a court in certain situations. For more information about those situations, see the General FAQs on this page.

  2. You must first complete a Commission-approved orientation course. You must then complete and file the appropriate applications, pay the applicable fees, satisfy the examination requirements, and pass a criminal history background check  by DPS and the FBI.
    Please refer to the Initial Licensure page of our website for additional information on this process.

  3. Applications are available on the Forms page of our website.

    1. Applicants register for the exam with the JBCC by the established deadline date.
    2. Applicants must refer to the rosters on the Exams page to confirm their registration information. This will serve as official notification of their exam registration.

    Any questions regarding their registration must be submitted to courtinterpreters@txcourts.govPlease refer to the Exam Procedures section of the Exams page for additional information on this process.

  4. The Commission accepts the written and oral examinations offered by the following entities:

    • Member states of the National Center for State Courts Language Access Services Section,
    • National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators (NAJIT)
    • Federal Court Interpreter Certification (916) 263-3494.

     

  5. The Commission offers the examinations that are developed by the National Center for State Courts (NCSC). Please see the list of Exam Languages on the Exams page of our website.

  6. The written examination will measure English comprehension, court terminology, and ethics. The oral examination will measure foreign language competency in sight, sequential and simultaneous interpretation.

  7. If you wish to become licensed in a language other than those shown on the Exams page of our website, the Commission accepts oral examinations offered by the following entities as satisfying the oral examination requirements:

    1. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Language Line Services (800) 752-0093,
    2. Lionbridge (888) 241-9149, extension 3966.

    Please refer to the Exam Languages & Other Information section on the Exams page of our website for additional information.

  8. Yes. Each license will have one or more language endorsements other than English. Knowledge of English is mandatory.

  9. No. The license is only for individuals, not for companies or organizations. Each person practicing as a licensed court interpreter must hold a separate license.

  10. The Commission's website has a listing of all licensed court interpreters and their language endorsement(s) on the LCI homepage.

  11. If you fail the exam, you must wait at least 6 months before you re-take the exam.

  12. You must meet the renewal requirements indicated on the Renewals page of our website.

    If your license has been expired for more than one year you may not renew your license. You must apply for a new license.

    You may be subject to enforcement actions, including administrative penalties and sanctions, for operating with an expired license (expired less than one year) or operating without a license (expired one year or more).

    If your renewal application is postmarked before your expiration date, it is considered a timely renewal.

Denial of License Renewal by the Office of the Attorney General

  1. The Child Support Division (CSD) sends these notices. Contact CSD at (800) 252-8014.

  2. Office of the Attorney General's Child Support Division records show you have not made a payment in more than 6 months.

  3. You may not use your license after the expiration date on the license. However, you may work between the date you receive the nonrenewable notice and the expiration date on the license.

  4. Contact the Office of the Attorney General's Child Support Division (CSD) to settle payment of any amounts you may owe and to change the nonrenewable status of your license. Contact CSD at (800) 252-8014.

  5. First, contact the Office of the Attorney General's Child Support Division at (800) 252-8014 to resolve payment of any amounts you may owe and obtain a release. Then, apply with the Commission for renewal of your license.

  6. You may not apply for renewal of your license until the Commission receives a release from the Child Support Division of the Office of the Attorney General.

  7. If you haven't received a release from the Child Support Division of the Office of the Attorney General approximately 65 days before the expiration of your license, you will receive a notice from the Department Commission that you need to get a release from the Child Support Division in order to apply to the Department Commission for license renewal. You may not use your license after the expiration date on

  8. License holders have 365 days from the expiration date to apply for license late renewal. License holders who are barred from license renewal due to past-due child support must obtain a release from the Child Support Division of the Office of the Attorney General and apply for renewal within the 365-day period. Otherwise, the license cannot be late renewed.

Continuing Education

  1. Each licensed court interpreter is required to complete eight hours of continuing education credit in courses approved by the Commission to renew his/her license, including two hours of instruction in ethics.
    Please refer to the Renewals page of our website for additional information.

  2. Yes, you may carry forward to the next licensing period up to four continuing education hours. However, ethics hours may not be carried forward.

  3. Submission of complete applications, including documentation of completion of approved CE, is always better. If your application is incomplete, your application will not be processed. We encourage you to submit your paperwork early so your license won't expire and you won't be subject to late fees.

  4. Information is on the Continuing Education page of our website. The CE Seminars list is updated as courses are approved.

  5. First, check the Continuing Education page of our web site, which has a link to approved CE Seminars. This is a current list of programs that have been approved by the Commission. It is not a complete list of all programs in the State of Texas. Rather, it is just a list of courses submitted to us and approved.

    If a course you want to take is not on the list, you must submit an application for course approval to the Commission. Your application will be reviewed to determine if, based on the JBCC Rules, the course will be approved and, if so, for how many hours. You may obtain the CE approval form from the Continuing Education section on the 'Forms' page of our web site.

  6. One hour of continuing education is equivalent to 50 minutes of actual instruction time.

  7. Please refer to the list of approved courses on the continuing education page of our website. This list is updated as courses are approved.

  8. If a course you want to take is not on the list, you must submit an application for course approval to the Commission. Your application will be reviewed to determine if, based on the JBCC Rules, the course will be approved and, if so, for how many hours. You may obtain the CE approval form from the Continuing Education section of the Forms page of our web site.

  9. Interpreters are required to report their continuing education to the Commission when they apply for renewal of their license.

  10. The program provider will issue you a course completion certificate or other documentation that you completed the course. If you have questions, please contact the program provider.

  11. No. The JBCC does not accept partial completion of a continuing education course. However, a provider may allow you to finish the course at another time.

  12. No. This service is not currently available from the JBCC. To keep track of your CE hours, you must maintain copies of your CE documentation from the programs you've completed. Doing so will help you to have access to the total hours you've obtained for continuing education.

  13. If you do not receive your course completion certificate, please contact the program provider.

  14. Instructors who are licensees may arrange with the provider to get continuing education hours for that portion of the course which the instructor taught. However, if the instructor does not teach the entire course, the instructor must attend the remainder of the course to obtain credit for the whole course. No partial course credit is allowed.

  15. Courses which are not approved by the JBCC as continuing education courses may not be used for license renewal. If the college course is a JBCC- approved continuing education course, then the course hours can be used for license renewal. However, the courses must be taken during the period of the license being renewed. (See question and answer #1.)

  16. Licensees are required to keep their course completion certificates for 3 years after the date of course completion.